Goran Ekstrom
Personal Information
Göran
Ekström
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Seismology Geology and Tectonophysics
Contact Information
108I Seismology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8427

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Göran Ekström's main research interest is global earthquake seismology. This includes the detailed study of individual earthquake ruptures, and the relationship between seismicity and the large scale tectonic deformation of the crust and mantle over geologic time. Prof. Ekström's teaching interests include Environmental Geology, in particular the science and policy aspects of the assessment and mitigation of Geologic Hazards.
Education
Ph.D.
Harvard University
1987
B.A.
Swarthmore College
1981
Stephanie Pfirman
Personal Information
Stephanie
Pfirman
Adjunct Senior Research Scientist
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Marine Geology and Geophysics
Hirschorn Professor and Chair (Barnard College)
Environmental Science Barnard College
Hirschorn Professor and Chair
Environmental Science Barnard College
Contact Information
109D Oceanography
61 ROute 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8475

Fax: 

(845) 365-8156

Fields of interest: 

Role of sea ice in the redistribution of sediments and pollutants in the Arctic

In 1894, Fridjof Nansen, a Norwegian scientist, was surprised to see on an expedition that Arctic sea ice wasn't always white and pristine, but was often discolored by dust and mud. He vowed to return one day to discover where the sediment was coming from. But Nansen never did return, and 100 years later I became intrigued by the same question when I saw the wide expanses of "dirty" ice in the Arctic. As a result, my main research interest is determining the role of sea ice - a transport mechanism unique to the Arctic - in the redistribution of sediments and pollutants in the Arctic. When I sample a floe for sediment or pollutant load, I want to know where it came from, what's happened to it since the ice first formed and where the ice is going to melt and release its incorporated materials.

I am developing and using a variety of methods to find answers to these questions. In a broader view, an unusual combination of environmental conditions in the Arctic exacerbates climate change, ozone depletion and deposition of pollutants. DDT and heavy metals from regions far to the south accumulate in the Arctic marine food chain. I am interested in finding out how warming in the Arctic could affect the pathways and fate of contaminants.

Education
Ph.D.
MIT
1985
Bachelor of Arts
Colgate
1978
Jerry F. McManus
Personal Information
Jerry
F.
McManus
Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Geochemistry
Contact Information
239 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8722

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155
Marc W. Spiegelman
Personal Information
Marc
W.
Spiegelman
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Seismology Geology and Tectonophysics
Contact Information
108K Seismology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 704-2323

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Dynamic fluid flow, from magma migration theory to sedimentary basins and groundwater hydrology.

My early enthusiasm for earth sciences was fed by a steady diet of outdoor activities and PBS documentaries. While it rapidly became clear that I would not be the next Jacques Cousteau, I found that I could combine my tastes for backpacking and physics as a geology/geophysics major. As a Harvard undergraduate, I constructed physical models of mountain-building processes between stints as a U.S. Forest Service ranger, then moved to Cambridge, England, where I conducted my Ph.D. research on magma migration in the mantle.

At Lamont, I have been extending magma migration theory into a more general one that describes the interactions between solids and fluids in the earth. Magma migration provides an important link between large-scale mantle convection and petrology/geochemistry and my research seeks to close the gap between these two disciplines. This work also lends new insights into other fluid-flow problems, current research is attempting to extend this theory to investigate dynamic fluid flow in sedimentary basins and groundwater hydrology. My work is primarily computational and my students, colleagues and I are implementing new techniques and technologies to take advantage of parallel computing. With a quantitative basis for fluid-flow research, we hope to integrate this theory with Lamont's strong observational programs in petrology, basin dynamics and groundwater tracer studies.

Education
Ph.D.
Cambridge
1989
Bachelor of Arts
Harvard
1985

Geophysics

The Geophysics faculty are concerned with the broad range of physical processes affecting the solid Earth, from the core, mantle, and crust to the cryosphere, and carry out related studies of Mercury, Mars, and Earth's moon.

Oceanography

Oceanography in the Department includes ocean circulation and dynamics, air-sea interaction, chemical tracers and cycles, interactions with marine life, and the sedimentary record of past oceans and climates at timescales ranging from years to millions of years.

Paleoclimate

Paleoclimate scientists attempt to understand fundamental aspects of the Earth's Climate System by using natural recorders of past climate change together with climate models to identify regional, hemispheric or inter-hemispheric climate patterns, and to provide the baseline for ongoing and future climate change

Biogeoscience

Members of the new Biogeoscience group investigate living systems as fundamental components of the Earth System and possibly other planetary systems through the integrated study of biology, geochemistry, and geology.

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