Modern and Future Climate

The Climate Science Group strives to solve problems in climate on timescales from seasonal to Quaternary and beyond. We use models representing the ocean, the atmosphere, the cryosphere and the land surface, ranging from simple to complex. In addition to analyses of data from recent decades, we develop techniques to extract as much as possible from the inaccurate and sparse data of the past.
Much of our work, often in collaboration with the International Research Institute located at Lamont, has been on understanding and predicting seasonal to interannual climate variations, especially El Niño and the North Atlantic Oscillation, and on the impacts of such variations on agriculture and health. Our recent focus is on accounting for the startlingly abrupt changes apparent in the paleoclimate record. Could such changes occur in the near future? Our investigations of the past and the future rely heavily on our knowledge of modern climate dynamics.

Jerry F. McManus
Personal Information
Jerry
F.
McManus
Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Geochemistry
Contact Information
239 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8722

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155
Martin Stute
Personal Information
Martin
Stute
Adjunct Senior Research Scientist
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Geochemistry
Adjunct Senior Research Scientist
Ann Whitney Olin Professor and Co-Chair
Environmental Science Barnard College
Contact Information
109 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8704

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Isotope Hydrology, Water Resources, Paleoclimate.

When I was about eight-years-old, I did not speak to my parents for a whole day because they threw a banana peel out of our car, which I found was unacceptable from an environmental point of view. I knew early on that I wanted to dedicate my career to environmental issues and studied Physics, because there was no such thing as Environmental Science back then. My PhD thesis research topic at the University of Heidelberg focussed on novel tracer techniques to study the dynamics of ground water flow, and the use of ground water as an archive of paleoclimate. I have been interested in water issues ever since and can still hardly resist to take a plunge into a thermal spring I encounter or take a sip from a well that might tap an interesting aquifer. I believe that water will play an increasingly important role in our attempts to achieve a sustainable global development. I am also trying hard to be a decent teacher and undergraduate and graduate student adviser, because I think that is where faculty members have the most influence on the future of our planet.

Some of my projects include:

  • Health Effects and Geochemistry of Lead ( details )
  • San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD/EarthScope) ( details )
Education
Prom.
Heidelberg
1989
Dipl.
Heidelberg
1985
Selected Publications:
A paleotemperature record derived from dissolved noble gases in groundwater of the Aquia Aquifer (Maryland, USA), Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Stute, M.; Clark, J. F.; Reuter, R. F.; Schlosser, P. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Mar, Volume: 66, Issue: 5 p.: 797-817 (2002) Pii S0016-7037(01)00804-3
Tritium/He-3 dating of river infiltration: An example from the Danube in the Szigetkoz area, Hungary, Stute, M.; Deak, J.; Revesz, K.; Bohlke, J. K.; Deseo, E.; Weppernig, R.; Schlosser, P. Ground Water Sep-Oct, Volume: 35, Issue: 5 p.: 905-911 (1997)
Cooling of Tropical Brazil (5-Degrees-C) during the Last Glacial Maximum, Stute, M.; Forster, M.; Frischkorn, H.; Serejo, A.; Clark, J. F.; Schlosser, P.; Broecker, W. S.; Bonani, G. Science Jul 21, Volume: 269, Issue: 5222 p.: 379-383 (1995)

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