Biogeoscience

Members of the new Biogeoscience group investigate living systems as fundamental components of the Earth System and possibly other planetary systems through the integrated study of biology, geochemistry, and geology. In DEES, students have the opportunity to work with faculty in aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecology, biological oceanography, evolutionary biology, microbial genomics, biogeochemistry, paleobiology and astrobiology. DEES Biogeosciences faculty conduct research on biodiversity and ecosystem function, ecological responses to climate change, biogeochemical cycling and storage of nutrients and carbon, plant physiology and biooptics (both aquatic and terrestrial), and the application of isotopic, fossil and organic geochemical tracers to the study of climate and Earth history. Fieldwork and lab experiments employ diverse analytical, observational and modeling tools to build understanding of the Biosphere and its interactions within the Earth System, in the past, present and future.

Mukund Rao
Personal Information
Mukund
Rao
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
Tree Ring Lab
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(917) 834-5543

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

- Using tree-rings to understand long-term climate and streamflow variability.
- Climate, ecosystem, and societal interactions, focussing on pastoral nomadic herding communities in the Mongolian forest-steppe.
- Statistical methods of reconstructing past climate.

Complete list of publications:
https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=sJ8d66gAAAAJ&hl=en

Education
M.A. Climate and Society
Columbia University, USA
08/2013
B.Tech Chemical Engineering
Amrita School of Engineering, India
07/2012
Selected Publications:
A double bootstrap approach to Superposed Epoch Analysis to evaluate response uncertainty, Rao, M. P.; Cook, E. R.; Cook, B. I.;, Anchukaitis, K. J.; D'Arrigo, R. D.; Krusic, P. J; LeGrande, A. N.; Dendrochronologia, Volume: 55 p.: 119-124 (2019) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dendro.2019.05.001
Six Centuries of Upper Indus Basin Streamflow Variability and Its Climatic Drivers, Rao, M. P.; Cook, E. R.; Cook, B. I.; Palmer, J.; Uriarte, M.; Devineni, N.; Lall, U.; D’Arrigo, R. D.; Woodhouse, C.A.; Ahmed, M.; Zafar, M.U.; Khan, N.; Khan, A.; Wahab, M. Water Resources Research (2018) https://doi.org/10.1029/2018WR023080
European and Mediterranean hydroclimate responses to tropical volcanic forcing over the last millennium, Rao, M. P.; Cook, B. I.; Cook, E. R.; D'Arrigo, R. D.; Krusic, P. J.; Anchukaitis, K. J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Buckley, B. M.; Davi, N. K.; Leland, C; Griffin, K. L. Geophysical Research Letters (2017) 10.1002/2017GL073057
Karakorum temperature out of phase with hemispheric trends for the past five centuries, Zafar, M. U.; Ahmed, M.; Rao, M. P.; Buckley, B. M.; Khan, N.; Wahab, M.; Palmer, J. Climate Dynamics 06/2015 p.: 1-10 (2015) 10.1007/s00382-015-2685-z
A long-term context (931–2005 CE) for rapid warming over Central Asia, Davi, N. K.; D'Arrigo, R.; Jacoby, G. C.; Cook, E. R.; Anchukaitis, K.; Nachin, B.; Rao, M. P., Leland, C. Quaternary Science Reviews 08/2015, Volume: 121 p.: 89-97 (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2015.05.020
Dzuds, droughts, and livestock mortality in Mongolia, Rao, M. P.; Davi, N. K.; D'Arrigo, R. D.; Skees, J.; Nachin, B.; Leland, C.; Lyon, B.; Wang, S. Y.; Byambasuren, O. Environmental Research Letters 07/2015, Volume: 10, Issue: 7 p.: 074012 (2015) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/10/7/074012
Hugh Ducklow
Personal Information
Hugh
Ducklow
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
208 Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8167

Fax: 

(845) 365-8163

Fields of interest: 

Ecosystems ecology, marine and global biogeochemistry, microbial ecology
Education
PhD
Harvard University
05/1977
MS
Harvard University
05/1974
AB
Harvard College
05/1972
Selected Publications:
Mixing regime-dependent causality between phytoplankton and bacteria in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean ecosystem., Kim, H; Lee, DE; Ducklow, HW Marine Ecology Progress Series, Volume: 600 p.: 41-53 (2018)
Spring–summer net community production, new production, particle export and related water column biogeochemical processes in the marginal sea ice zone of the western Antarctic Peninsula 2012–2014, Ducklow, HW; Stukel, MR; Eveleth, R; Doney, SC; Jickells, T; Schofield, OM; Baker, AR; Brindle, J; Chance, R; Cassar, N. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, Volume: 376 (2018) 10.1098/rsta.2017.0173
Bacterial community segmentation facilitates the prediction of ecosystem function along the coast of the western Antarctic Peninsula., Bowman, JS; Amaral-Zettler, LA; Rich, JJ; Luria, CM; Ducklow, HW ISME Journal (2017) 10.1038/ismej.2016.204
The Freshwater System West of the Antarctic Peninsula: Spatial and Temporal Changes, Meredith, M.P.; Venables, H. J.; Clarke, A.; Ducklow, H. W.; Erickson, M.; Leng, M. J.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; van den Broeke, Mi. R. Journal of Climate, Volume: 26 p.: 1669-84 (2013)
What is the metabolic status of the oligotrophic ocean, Ducklow, H. W.; Doney, S. C. Annual Review of Marine Science, Volume: 5 p.: 15.1-15.9 (2012)
Production and Fate of Bacteria in the Oceans, Ducklow, H. W. Bioscience, Volume: 33, Issue: 8 p.: 494-501 (1983)
Natalie T. Boelman
Personal Information
Natalie
T.
Boelman
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Lecturer
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Contact Information
128B Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8480

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

The main goals of my research are to better understand:

  • the ways in which the composition, physical structure, and phenology of Arctic vegetation are changing in response to climate change (Project websites: NASA: Forest-Tundra Ecotone, and, NASA: LiDAR and tundra shrubs)

  •  how these changes impact resident and migratory animals and in turn how animals mediate climate-induced change in the region (Project websites: NSF: TeamBird,  NASA: Animals on the Move, and NSF: TeamVole)

  • how near and remote-sensing techniques can be used to study dynamics in ecological form and function (see above projects)

 

 

Education
Ph.D. in Earth & Environmental Sciences
Columbia University
09/2004
M.A. in Earth & Environmental Sciences
Columbia University
06/2001
Bachelor of Science in Physical Geography
McGill University
1999
Victoria Diaz-Bonilla (former Senior Thesis student, DEES)
Elizabeth Tupper (former Senior Thesis student, Barnard College)
Adam Formica (former Senior Thesis student, DEES)
Lacey-Harris-Cobie (former Senior Thesis student, E3B)
Case Prager (former PhD Student, E3B)
Jess Gersony (former Senior Thesis student, E3B)
Rebecca Gibson (former Senior Thesis student, E3B)
Johanna Jensen (current PhD Student, E3B)
Shailee Shah (current PhD Student, E3B)
Laia Andreu Hayles
Personal Information
Laia
Andreu Hayles
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Biology and Paleo Environment
Lecturer
Professional Studies
Contact Information
Tree Ring Lab
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964
(845) 365-8517

Fax: 

(845) 365-8152

Fields of interest: 

Dendroclimatology, Paleoclimatology and Ecology in Mediterranean, Boreal and Tropical ecosystems.

My research interest is to understand the interactions between forests and climate applying dendrochronological techniques, using these relationships: (1) to study ecological processes such as forest response to climate; (2) to estimate climatic conditions before the existence of instrumental records (paleoclimatology).

Jan-Erik Tesdal
Personal Information
Jan-Erik
Tesdal
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
Jan-Erik_Tesdal.jpg
123 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8781

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150
Kevin L. Griffin
Personal Information
Kevin
L.
Griffin
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
128B Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8371

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Plant respiration; global carbon cycle; forest ecology

After more than 150 million years of isolation the podocarps that dominate the forests of the west coast of the south island of New Zealand have remarkably slow growth rates by comparison to most other forest tree species. The question is, why? In New York, the aging eastern deciduous forests continue to rapidly accumulate carbon. Could this be the result of the high levels of atmospheric N deposition this area receives? When plants are grown in elevated CO2 photosynthesis is stimulated initially but often this enhancement does not last and given time, a strong acclimation to the new growth environment can occur. Is there a reason why some plants acclimate to CO2 and others do not? Plant respiration is often thought of as the processes by which plants loose carbon during the night. How then can we estimate the contribution of respiration to the carbon balance of arctic plants which never experience night during the growing season? Plant cells from leaves of plants grown in elevated CO2 tend to have twice the number of mitochondria and chloroplast as cells from plants grown in ambient CO2. Is there a link between this structural observation and physiological function?

These are a few examples of the type of research questions my lab is currently working on. The objective of this research is to explain processes in plant and ecosystem ecology in terms of the physiological, biochemical and biophysical processes involved. Ultimately we hope to increase our understanding of both the role of the Earth's vegetation in the global carbon cycle and the interactions between the carbon cycle and the Earth's climate system.

Some of my projects include:

  • Environmental Controls on Tree Growth: A Comparison between the Cascade Brook Watershed of Black Rock Forest, NY and a Native New Zealand Forest.
  • Effects of developmental changes on the physiological processes that regulate photosynthetic responses to climate change.
  • Land-Water Interactions at the Catchment Scale: Linking Biogeochemistry and Hydrology.

 

 

Education
Ph.D.
Duke
1994
M.E.S.
Yale
1987
Bachelor of Arts
Whittier
1985
Selected Publications:
Leaf respiration is differentially affected by leaf vs. stand-level night-time warming, Griffin, K. L.; Turnbull, M.; Murthy, R.; Lin, G. H.; Adams, J.; Farnsworth, B.; Mahato, T.; Bazin, G.; Potasnak, M.; Berry, J. A. Global Change Biology May, Volume: 8, Issue: 5 p.: 479-485 (2002)
Canopy position affects the temperature response of leaf respiration in Populus deltoides, Griffin, K. L.; Turnbull, M.; Murthy, R. New Phytologist Jun, Volume: 154, Issue: 3 p.: 609-619 (2002)
Leaf dark respiration as a function of canopy position in Nothofagus fusca trees grown at ambient and elevatedCO(2) partial pressures for 5 years, Griffin, K. L.; Tissue, D. T.; Turnbull, M. H.; Schuster, W.; Whitehead, D. Functional Ecology Aug, Volume: 15, Issue: 4 p.: 497-505 (2001)
Andrew Juhl
Personal Information
Andrew
Juhl
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Adjunct Associate Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Contact Information
122 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8837

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Plankton ecology, Phytoplankton growth and physiology, Zooplankton grazing, Harmful algae, Dinoflagellate blooms, Physical/biological interactions, Nutrient/microbial pollution of coastal waters, Sea-ice algae

As an aquatic ecologist and oceanographer, my research and teaching focus on how aquatic microorganisms and their predators interact with each other and their physical/chemical environment. I emphasize a holistic perspective encompassing the range of planktonic organisms found in coastal marine systems, estuaries, rivers and lakes, including: planktonic algae, protist microzooplankton, invertebrate zooplankton, and bacteria.    

My research approach links hypothesis-driven, controlled laboratory experiments with small-scale field manipulations and field observations. Such research is inherently interdisciplinary, connecting cell biology and physiology with ecology, and physics and chemistry of the environment. My work finds application in addressing basic and applied questions related to aquatic geochemical fluxes, harmful algal blooms, pollution and water quality, and sea ice ecology

Please see my website for more information.

 

 

 

Education
Ph.D. - Biological Oceanography
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
2000
M. S. - Biological Oceanography
College of Oceanography, Oregon State University
1991
B.S. - Zoology
University of Wisconsin, Madison
1988
Selected Publications:
Overwintering of gelatinous zooplankton in the coastal arctic ocean, Purcell, Jennifer E.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Mańko, Maciej K.; Aumack, Craig F. Marine Ecology Progress Series (2017)
Conserved transcriptional responses to nutrient stress in bloom-forming algae, Harke, Matthew J; Juhl, Andrew R.; Haley, Sheean T.; Alexander, Harriet; Dyhrman, Sonya T. Frontiers in Microbiology (2017)
Transcriptional response of the harmful raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo to nitrate and phosphate stress, Haley, Sheean T.; Alexander, Harriet; Juhl, Andrew R.; T. Dyhrman, Sonya T. Harmful Algae (2017)
Elizabeth Min
Personal Information
Elizabeth
Min
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
Elizabeth_Min.jpg
128 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(718) 578-8588

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150
Maureen Raymo
Personal Information
Maureen
Raymo
Bruce C. Heezen/Lamont Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Adjunct Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Director - Core Repository
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Contact Information
105E Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8801

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150
Selected Publications:
Departures from eustasy in Pliocene sea-level records, Raymo, Maureen E.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; O'Leary, Michael J.; DeConto, Robert M.; Hearty, Paul L. NATURE GEOSCIENCE MAY, Volume: 4 p.: 328–332 (2011)
Diachronous benthic delta O-18 responses during late Pleistocene terminations, Lisiecki, Lorraine E.; Raymo, Maureen E. PALEOCEANOGRAPHY SEP 23, Volume: 24 p.: PA3210 (2009)
Plio-Pleistocene Ice Volume, Antarctic Climate, and the Global δ18O Record, Raymo, M. E., L. E. Lisiecki, and K. H. Nisancioglu Science, Volume: 313 p.: 492 (2006)
A Pliocene-Pleistocene stack of 57 globally distributed benthic delta O-18 records, Lisiecki, L. E.; Raymo, M. E. PALEOCEANOGRAPHY JAN 18, Volume: 20 p.: PA1003 (2005)
The 41 kyr world: Milankovitch's other unsolved mystery, Raymo, M. E.; Nisancioglu, K. PALEOCEANOGRAPHY MAR 6, Volume: 18 p.: 1011 (2003)
The timing of major climate terminations, Raymo, M. E. PALEOCEANOGRAPHY AUG, Volume: 12 p.: 577–585 (1997)
THE HIMALAYAS, ORGANIC-CARBON BURIAL, AND CLIMATE IN THE MIOCENE, RAYMO, ME PALEOCEANOGRAPHY JUN, Volume: 9 p.: 399–404 (1994)
Tectonic forcing of late Cenozoic climate, Raymo, M.E. and W.F. Ruddiman Nature, Volume: 359 p.: 117-122 (1992)
Evolution of Atlantic Pacific Delta-C-13 Gradients over the Last 2.5 My, Raymo, M. E.; Ruddiman, W. F.; Shackleton, N. J.; Oppo, D. W. Earth and Planetary Science Letters Mar, Volume: 97, Issue: 3-4 p.: 353-368 (1990)
Sam Phelps
Personal Information
Sam
Phelps
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
104 Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8727

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

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