With the advent of the Storke Memorial Fund, department graduate students organize annual field trips. Past field trips include a trip to Iceland, Yellowstone/Wind River Mountains/Snake River Plain and a trip to Nova Scotia with Professor Paul Olsen, as well as a number of local smaller day or weekend trips.

 


Long Island Field Trip, August 2013

This three-day trip, guided by Prof. Arnold Gordon, was the first graduate student field trip that explored New York City’s eastside backyard--Long Island and its barrier island (Fire Island) as well as the lagoon between them (Great South Bay), with the main focus on the climate change, extreme storm impact, coastal ecosystem and marine environment. The participants carried out a hydrological survey in the Great South Bay that recently suffered from severe storm Sandy and brown tides.

The graduate student field trip to Long Island in August of 2013 was made possible by the Storke Memorial Fund, designated to support educational activities at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. The participants on this trip consisted of Ph.D. students in the Earth and Environmental Science Department representing sub-disciplines including climatology, atmospheric science, physical oceanography, and biogeoscience.


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NY-NJ Mineral Field Trip, August 2013

Sometimes it is easy to forget the geologic wonders that exist in our own backyard, and it was this theme that guided our planning. The initial goal of this field trip was to explore famous mineral occurrences in the greater New York/New Jersey area in order to understand their origin from an academic perspective. The three destinations that we chose could easily be considered “Top 10” for many mineral aficionados in the New England area: the megacrystic garnet at Gore Mountain, NY; doubly-terminated quartz crystals at Herkimer, NY; and the fluorescent mineral capital of the world at Sterling Hill, NJ. Fortunately, our driving route took us through another region of geologic curiosities, the Adirondack Mountains physiographic province. Incorporating the Adirondacks allowed the students to expand the initial limited scope of this field trip to pursue other subjects including the orogenic history of New York State, metamorphism and melting during cratonic growth, and glacial peculiarities from the most recent ice age.

Our 3-day mineral-collecting field trip took place in August 2013 and was made possible by the Stroke Memorial Fund at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. The trip was organized by a group of Ph.D. students from the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and was accompanied by a student-led seminar series.


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 A detailed electronic map of the trip with indicated locations
 of all visited outcrops is available in the Google Earth format.

 

 

 


Field Trip to Nova Scotia, August-September 2012

In the late summer of 2012, twelve Ph.D students and one professor from the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences embarked on an eleven-day field excursion to Nova Scotia. The trip stopped at outcrops detailing the rich tectonic and climatic history of northeastern North America over the Phanerozoic.  In the late summer of 2012, twelve Ph.D students and one professor from the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences embarked on an eleven-day field excursion to Nova Scotia. The trip stopped at outcrops detailing the rich tectonic and climatic history of northeastern North America over the Phanerozoic. 

Terrain of Cape Breton from Cape SmokeyThe graduate student field trip to Nova Scotia in August-September of 2012 was made possible by the Storke Memorial Fund, designated to support educational activities at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. The participants on this trip consisted of Ph.D. students in the Earth and Environmental Science Department representing a diversity of sub-disciplines--including geodynamics, stratigraphy, sedimentary geology, igneous petrology, glaciology, geochemistry, oceanography, and paleoclimate.

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Field Trip to Yellowstone, June-July 2011

The complex and varied geological history of the Yellowstone region of Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana has resulted in some of the most stunning landscapes in the United States. This wide variety of fascinating and unique geological features made it an ideal destination for the type of multi-disciplinary group that characterizes the Ph.D. program's student body.

Amelia Paukert and Tetons.The graduate student field trip to Yellowstone in summer 2011 was made possible by the Storke Memorial Fund, designated to support educational activities at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. Although the trip was labeled “Yellowstone”, most of the excursion focused on the geology surrounding Yellowstone National Park and included the geology of Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana.  The participants on this trip consisted of 18 Ph.D. students in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program led by Professor Mark Anders. The group spent 10 days traveling through the region in late June and early July.

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Field Trip to Iceland, August 2010

Iceland is a unique place to study a great variety of geologic and climate-driven processes, and to observe how interactions between these processes create unusual and diverse environments. High rates of volcanic activity, crustal deformation, rapid erosion, interplay of glacial and volcanic forces, and dramatic climate effects make Iceland an attractive destination for a wide range of Earth scientists.

Group photo in the Myvatn Nature Baths.The graduate student field trip to Iceland in August 2010 was made possible by the Storke Memorial Fund, designated to support educational activities at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. The participants on this trip consisted of Ph.D. students in the Earth and Environmental Sciences and Master students from the Climate and Society Program. This group of students represented a full spectrum of sub-disciplines, which allowed us to cover a wide variety of scientific topics including geophysics, tectonics, seismicity, volcanism, petrology, geothermal power generation and carbon sequestration, glaciology, climate and ecology as well as how these have shaped Icelandic culture and history.

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Field Trip to Mono Lake, California, June 2009

In June of 2009 a group of 11 Columbia Graduate students spent four days exploring the geology and natural beauty of the Mono Lake, California area. Mono Lake is a spectacular place for anyone interested in the Earth and how it works.

Tufa Tower at the edge of Mono Lake.The graduate student field trip to Mono Lake in June 2009 was made possible by the Storke Memorial Fund, designated to support educational activities at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. Sidney Hemming and Gary Hemming, who have spent over a decade conducting research in the Mono Lake area, acted as guides for the field trip. The student participants on this trip consisted of Ph.D. students in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department and Master students from the Climate and Society Program. This group of students represented a full spectrum of sub-disciplines, which allowed us to cover a wide variety of scientific topics including geophysics, tectonics, volcanism, petrology, glaciology, climate and ecology.

Continue Reading | Download the Mono Lake Field Guide