EESC W4835 Fall 2001: Wetlands and Climate Change Problem Thursdays

 


Week 1:

An Atlantic white-
cedar swamp

Option A:[encouraged]
Choose a wetland community and and describe it. Also, try to think how climate change may impact this system. Prepare a 5 minute overview talk aboout your community type to present in class on Thursday.

A good source of references on wetland communities can be found below.

Date Due: Thursday, September 4th, 2003

 

Reference Resources

general sources:

electronic journal sources:

 

Back to the Wetlands and Climate Change Semester Schedule.

 


The octopus sycamore tree
Black Rock Forest, NY

Week 2:

Choose a watershed and download hydrological data here.

You can describe trends at the real-time, daily, or weekly time steps or examine below normal flows for any watershed that you choose. The type of graph that we are looking for would look something (but doesn't have to be exactly) like this.

OR

Go to the streamflow water data and download streamflow data for a station (or two for compartison, i.e. a small watershed vs a large watershed) at the time step you prefer (daily, weekly, or monthly). Graph the streamflow data and interpret your data.

It is not as easy to get the data from the web sites listed above as it was last time this class was taught. If you can find the particular hydrological/streamflow data that you are interested in from another source, please feel free to use that source. Another potential source can be found here.

For example, 2 years ago Hurrican Floyd ripped up the east coast. The resulting rain was readily apparent in the streamflow data. Unfortunately, there is no hurricane or tropical storm bearing down on the US. But, you could look for seasonal trends in climate (much climate data here and here) or see if a recent storm has passed through your watershed.

Potential Questions You Could Answer (but not the only ones): What changes did you observe in streamflow following a storm event? How long did it take for the storm pulse to move through your system? What role does the geography of the watershed play? If climate change produces larger storms, how may the hydrology change in your watershed? etc...

Summarize your data and interpretations. Be prepared to give a 5 minute oral presentation in class.

 

Date Due: Due Tuesday, September 18th

 

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Week 3.5:
You will be assigned to read one of the following articles and write a 1-page critique that includes:

Topic:
Biogeochemistry

Question:
How does dust and runoff affect estuaries?

Articles:

Leanes, Walsh et al. Limnology & Oceanography, Sept. 2001

This Journal can be found in the GEOLOGY Library (6th floor Schermerhorn) --- Call Number: 551.46 L62
or at the GEOSCIENCE Library (Lamont Hall - LDEO Library) --- Call Number: GC1 .L62

or

Nitrogen Dynamics in Rivers and Streams Gulf of Mexico anoxia - Science Feb 9, 291: 968 and EOS 81: 321-326.

EOS can be found at: the GEOLOGY Library (6th floor Schermerhorn) --- Call Number: QE500 .A6 or at the GEOSCIENCE Library (Lamont Hall - LDEO Library) --- Call Number: QE500 .A6

or

Freshwater wetlands - Richardson, Science 228: 1424. Mechanisms controlling phosphorus retention capacity in freshwater wetlands.

You must be at a Columbia or Lamont computer to successfully access this article online. If you have trouble downloading it from the link above, go here

A copy of all each article will be also be available at the DEES office (560 Schermerhorn Extension)

Date Due: Due Tuesday, September 27th

 

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Homework 4:

An Adirondack bog

You will be assigned to read one of the following articles and write a 1-page critique that includes:

Topic:
Inland Wetlands

To ease in your online adventure, make sure your browser cookies are turned on. If you are unsure of what browser cookies, don't worry about it. Your lovely and altruistic browser "manufacturer" has them on for you by default!!

Article 1:

Question:
How does plant diversity vary in wetlands?

Pollack et al. l998. Plant species richness in riparian wetlands- a test of biodiversity theory. Ecology 79(1): 94-105.

If you have trouble with that link, try this one.

Article 2:

Question:
How might climate change affect prairie potholes?

Sorenson et al. l998. Potential effects of global warming on waterfowl breeding populations breeding in the Northern Great Plains. Climatic Change 40: 343-369.

Go directly to the article here.

Article 3:

Question:
How might climate change affect Great Lakes Wetlands?

Mortsch, L.D. 1998 Assessing the impact of climate change on the Great Lakes shoreline wetlands. Climatic Change 40: 391-416.

Go directly to the article here.

Date Due: Due Thursday, October 4th

 

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Homework 5:

Sadie Hawkins Moose Dance
Fall, 1997 Island Pond, Vermont

You will be assigned to address of the following problems.

Topic:
Adaptations & Wetlands

Problem 1:

Question:

Background and information on how to answer this question:

Moose were extirpated from NYS in the late-19 century. Since 1980, moose have begun to re-populate, mostly in the Adirondack State Park, after nearly a century of absence. From the picture to the right, it is obvious that moose have an important impact on wetland ecosystems.

Likewise, climate seems to play an important role in the distribution of moose in North America. Since the probability of the Earth's temperature to increase 1.7-4.9 degrees Celsius in the next 100 years is 90%, the new moose population will certainly be impacted.

Readings & Reference Material:

The main article is:

H˝rnberg, S.. 2001. Changes in population density of moose (Alces alces) and damage to forests in Sweden. Forest Ecology and Management 149(1-3): 141-151.

The table of contents for the journal volume containing this article is here

Additional Reference Material:

To learn more about moose foraging, preferred aquatic habitats and general history, 2 references will be put on reserve in the DEES office including 50 pages of the book "Ecology and Management of the North American Moose." Don't be overwhelmed by what seems like a lot of material. Most of the pages have large pictures, graphs and includes a 5-7 page table of the type of plants eaten by moose. Also, some of the info may be relevant, some may not. Sections of the photocopied pages that are relevant to questions are bracketed.

ref 1: Hicks, A.C. 1986. The history and current status of moose in New York. Alces 22: 245-252.

ref 2: "Ecology and Management of the North American Moose"

ref 3: Online moose info

Write Up:

Your write up should be more like a short report. However, it should not be longer than a page. Try to concisely answer the questions above using the reference material available.

 

or

Problem 2:
Choose one of the following articles, write a 1-page critique that includes:

    Author
    Title
    Major point of paper
    Strength
    Weaknesses

and discuss adaptations of the ecosystem (Atlantic white-cedar or mangroves).

Paper 1:

You must be at a Columbia or LDEO computer to download this paper.

Eric F. Karlin. 1997. The Drowned Lands' Last Stand: An Inland Atlantic White Cedar Peat Swamp in Orange County, New York. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society, Vol. 124: 89-97.

If this link doesn't work, search JStor using the title of this paper.

or

Paper 2:

Smith, T.J., M.B. Robblee, H.R. Wanless, and T.W. Doyle. l994. Mangroves, hurricanes, and lightening strikes. Bioscience 44: 256-262.

This paper is not available online, but can be easily found at Columbia.

Also, all papers for this assignment will be available in the DEES office for photocopying by the end of Today (10/16/01).

Date Due: Due Thursday, October 18th


Homework 6:

Choose one of the following articles, write a 1-page critique that includes:

All 4 articles are on reserve in the DEES Office on the 5th floor of Schermerhorn

Paper 1:
Cronin et al., 2000. Climatic variability in the eastern US over the past millennium from Chesapeake Bay sediments. Geology 28:3-6.

This Journal can be found in the GEOLOGY Library (6th floor Schermerhorn; call # --- QE1 .G555)
or at the GEOSCIENCE Library (Lamont Hall - LDEO Library; call # --- QE1 .G555).

Paper 2:

Cooper, S.R. and Brush, G.1991. Long-term history of Chesapeake Bay Anoxia. Science 254:992-996.

If this link doesn't work, search JStor using the title of this paper.

Paper 3:

Howarth et al., 1991. Inputs of sediment and carbon to an estuarine ecosystem: influence of land use. Ecological Applications 1: 27-39.

If this link doesn't work, search JStor using the title of this paper.

Paper 4:

Heusser, L., Heusser, C.J., and Weiss, D. l975. Man's influence on the development of the estuarine marsh, Flax Pond, Long Island, New York. Bull. of the Torrey Bot. Club 102: 61-66.

If this link doesn't work, search JStor using the title of this paper.

You must be at a Columbia or LDEO computer to download the last 3 papers.

 

Date Due: Due Thursday, October 25th

 

Back to the Wetlands and Climate Change Semester Schedule.


A southern range limit boreal spruce
swamp in the Hudson Valley

Homework 7:

Choose one of the following articles, write a 1-page critique that includes:

All articles are on reserve in the DEES Office on the 5th floor of Schermerhorn

Paper 1:
Siegel et al. 1995. Climate-driven flushing of pore water in peatlands. Nature 374: 531-533.

This Journal can be found in the Biology Library
or at the GEOSCIENCE Library (Lamont Hall - LDEO Library).

Paper 2:

Lynn, S. and Karlin, E.F. l985. The vegetation of the low-shrub bogs of Northern New Jersey and adjacent New York: ecosystems at their southern limit Bull. of the Torrey Bot. Club 112: 436-444.

If this link doesn't work, search JStor using the title of this paper.

Paper 3:

Brown, A. l998. Gas production from an ombrotrophic bog- effect of climate change on microbial ecology. Climatic Change 40: 277-284.

If you have your browser's cookies turned off, you must turn them on to access the Climatic Change webpage.

This Journal can also be found in the the GEOSCIENCE Library (Lamont Hall - LDEO Library; call # --- QC981.8 .C5 C54 ).

You must be at or connected to a Columbia or LDEO computer to download the last 2 papers.

 

Date Due: Due Thursday, November 1st

 

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Homework 8:

Choose one of the following articles, write a 1-page critique that includes:

The article will not be on reserve in the DEES Office on the 5th floor of Schermerhorn this week.

If you can not downlaod either paper, please contact Neil.

Paper 1:
Ray W. Spear, Margaret B. Davis, Linda C. K. Shane. 1994.
Late Quaternary History of Low- and Mid-Elevation Vegetation in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Ecological Monographs, 64: 85-109.

If this link doesn't work, search JStor using the title of this paper.

Paper 2:

David W. Stahle, Malcolm K. Cleaveland, Dennis B. Blanton, Matthew D. Therrell, David A. Gay. 1998. The Lost Colony and Jamestown Droughts. Science 280: 564-567.

If this link doesn't work, try this link.

This Journal can also be found in the the Geoscience (Lamont Hall - LDEO Library), Biology, Barnard, Physics, Geology, Chemistry, Butler, Psychology, Engineering and Journalism Libraries.

You must be at or connected to a Columbia or LDEO computer to download the papers.

 

Date Due: Due Thursday, November 8th

 

Back to the Wetlands and Climate Change Semester Schedule.


Last Homework:

 

Read the Chapter 15 Values and Valuation of Wetlands.

Pick one method on valuation of wetlands in the last section Quantifying Wetland Values, choose an example wetland or type of wetland and quantify the value of your wetland.

Write a one page summary. Address the weaknesses and strengths of your method and be prepared to have a Battle Royale in class defending your work and the chosen method.

 

Date Due: Due Thursday, December 6th

 

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